Hazrat Sayyed Salar Masood Ghazi R.A.

  • Name: Hazrat Syed Salar Masood Ghazi (RA)
  • Date of Birth: 22 January 1015 AD
  • Date of Wisaal: 14 Rajjab 424 AH / 1032 AD
  • Date of Urs: 14 Rajjab
  • Resting at: Bahraich, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Story of Syed Salar Masood Ghazi Alavi Shaheed Bahraich india:

Bahraich is very famous because of the Dargah of Hazrat Ghazi Saiyyad Salar Masud, a famous eleventh century Islamic saint and soldier. His Dargah is a place for reverence for Muslims and Hindus alike. It was built by Firoz Shah Tughlaq. It is believed that people taking bath in the water of this Dargah become free of all skin diseases. The annual festival (Urs) at the Dargah is attended by thousands of people coming from far-off places of the country.

He was son of Hazrat Ghazi Salar Sahu who was descendent of Hazrat Muhammad Ibn al-Hanafiyyah, son of Hazrat Ali and Sitr-i-Mu’alla, who was sister of Hazrat Sultan Mahmud Ghaznavi. Hazrat Syed Salar Masood Ghazi (RA) came along with his uncle Hazrat Salar Saifudin and teacher Hazrat Syed Ibrahim Mashadi Bara Hazari (Salar-i-Azam of Sultan Mahmud Ghaznavi) in early 11th century to the South Asia for propagation of Islam. Hazrat Syed Salar Masood Ghazi (RA) was born at Ajmer on 22 January 1015 AD.

Hazrat Syed Salar Masood Ghazi (RA) of attained shahdat at the age of Eighteen.

Firoz Shah Tuglaq made the Dargah building

Mazaars of Paanch peer outside Roza of Hz Salar gaazi Masood

Room where Tabarukkats are kept

Main Gumbad Mubaarak above Roza of Hazrat Salaar Gaazi Masood

Mazaar of Hz. Salaar Gaazi Masood.

Mazaar of Zohra Bi – She was blind but got eyesight by the duaas of
Hazrat Sayed Saalaar Gaazi Masood. Her two brothers also stayed back
with her and their Mazaar is also next to her Mazaar.

Braihmn Shah Baaba was a Mazoob faqir

Masjid near Mazaar Shariff.

Qadme Rasool

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Know more about Bahraich : is a small town in the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. Located on the Saryu River, a tributary of river Ghaghra, Bahraich is 125 km north-east of Lucknow, the state capital. The towns of Barabanki, Gonda, Lakheempur and Sitapur share local boundaries with Bahraich. A factor which makes this town important is the international border shared with the neighboring country, Nepal.

Anaarkali is a place where 1000 years before Hazrat Salaar gaazi masood Hosres stopped and drank water..and Hazrat offerred his first prayers. This lake has since then never dried…

Mazaar near Anaarkali

Bahraich got its name from the Arabic word bahr which means a large body of water. Situated on the bank of river Ghaghra, it was named Bahraich. Although a small town, Bahraich happens to be a very old town of India. It was inhabited around the 10th century.

The main occupation of the residents of Bahraich is agriculture. In the British period, Bahraich was a famous market for grains and pulses. Even today, it is famous for agricultural products like pulses, wheat, rice, corn, sugar, and mustard. Also, there are dense forests in Nanpara and Bhinga region which account for herbs and timber

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Other Mazaars in Bahraich

Mazaar Hazrat Ibrahim, Ustaad of Hazrat Salaar Gaazi msood
who killed the King Sohail deve after the Shahdat of Hz. Salaar Gaazi Masood.

Hazrat Surk ru Salaar Saheb was Unchle (Chacha) of Hazrat Salaar Gaazi Masood

Mazaar of Hazrat Amir Sahab
(Friend of Hazrat Saalaar gazi Masood and Qutub of Bahraich)

Mazaar of Khanjar Shaheed

Mazaar of Nasrullah Shah is in Dikauli (Taoo of Hazrat Salaar Masood)

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Tomb

Later, Firoz Shah Tughlaq, the Turkic Sultan of Delhi who had a great admiration for Hazrat Syed Salar Masood Ghazi (RA) built his tomb.

Dargah of Hazrat Syed Salar Masood Ghazi (RA) is a place for reverence for Muslims and Hindus alike. It is believed that people taking bath in the water of this Dargah become free of all skin diseases. The annual festival (Urs) at the Dargah is attended by thousands of people coming from far-off places of the country.

Bahraich is a small town in the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. Situated on the Saryu River, a tributary of river Ghaghra, Bahraich is 125 km northeast of Lucknow, the state capital. The towns of Barabanki, Gonda, Lakheempur and Sitapur share local boundaries with Bahraich. A factor, which makes this town significant, is the international border shared with the neighboring country, Nepal.

Anarkali is a place where 1000 years before Hazrat Syed Salar Masood Ghazi (RA),

Horses stopped and drank water; And Hazrat offered his first prayers.

This lake has since then never dried.

Bahraich got its name from the Arabic word bahr, which means a large body of water. Situated on the bank of river Ghaghra, it was named Bahraich. Although a small town, Bahraich happens to be a very old town of India. It was inhabited around the 10th century.

The main occupation of the residents of Bahraich is agriculture. In the British period, Bahraich was a renowned market for grains and pulses. Even today, it is renowned for agricultural products like pulses, wheat, rice, corn, sugar, and mustard. Also, there are thick forests in Nanpara and Bhinga region, which account for herbs and timber.

Ghazi Miyan is also known as Bale Miyan, Bala Pir, Pir Bahlim and Gajan Dulha although his real name is Syed Salar Masud. In Bahraich district of Uttar Pradesh, his dargah has been an attraction for Hindu and Muslim devotees for nearly 1,000 years and a big fair is organised every year here. Ghazipur, Ghaziabad and Salarkotla that dot many regions of the country are perpetuating his memory.

In 1250, the Delhi Sultan Nasir ud din Mahmud constructed an architectural complex around the tomb, during his stay in Bahraich.

The 13th century poet Amir Khusro appears to mention Masud’s tomb (dargah) in a 1290 CE letter. According to this letter, the “fragrant tomb of martyred commander” at Bahraich spread the “perfume of odorous wood” throughout Hindustan.
In 1341, the Delhi Sultan Muhammad bin Tughluq and the Moroccon traveler Ibn Battuta visited the Bahraich dargah.
Ibn Battuta narrates the legends of the saints, and also provides some information about his cult, including the ritual veneration of his banner and spear.

Tarikh-i-Firuz Shahi (1357), written nearly three hundred years later. Hazrat Barani r.a mentions Masud as one of the heroes of Mahmud’s campaigns in India.The text was composed during the reign of the Delhi Sultan Firuz Shah Tughlaq, who considered himself to be a spiritual disciple of Masud. In 1353, the ruler of Lakhnauti (Bengal) invaded Bahraich, purportedly because he believed that a visit to Masud’s dargah could cure him of vitiligo. In response, Firuz Shah Tughluq invaded Bengal.He also visited the Bahraich dargah in 1372. According to the Sultan’s court historian Shams-i Siraj ‘Afif, Masud appeared in the Sultan’s dream, and asked him to prepare for the day of the Last Judgment, and to propagate Islam by adopting a tougher policy against the non-Muslims. The next day, Sultan Firuz Shah Tughluq got his head shaved like a Sufi neophyte, and started spending his nights in prayers. In 16th century, the Indo-Afghan soldier Dattu Sarvani claimed to have seen Masud in his dream.
he text states, “Salar Masud… was connected by blood with Mahmud Ghazni… sold his life bravely in battle and left an imperishable name.” According to Abul Fazl, the cult of Masud was very popular: his dargah attracted pilgrims from remote districts. These pilgrims carried offerings and multi-coloured flags to the dargah, and encamped at the Mughal capital Agra on their way to Bahraich. Abul Fazl further states that in 1561 CE, the Mughal emperor Akbar himself walked among these pilgrims, disguised as an ordinary merchant visiting the urs celebrations at the dargah.[9] In 1571 CE, Akbar made a grant for the Bahraich shrine.
The 17th century Persian language text Mirat-i-Masudi, written by the Sufi scholar Abdur Rahman Chishti, is the most comprehensive biography of Masud.The text is a historical romance, and the biography has a “gossipy feel” The author claims that Masud appeared in his dreams, and describes Masud’s various achievements and miracles. He states that his work is based on an “Old History” written by one Mulla Mahmud Ghazanavi.
In 1765, Akbar’s grant was renewed by Shuja-ud-Daula, the Nawab of Awadh. His successor Asaf-ud-Daula visited the Bahraich shrine several times.
Gradually, Masud came to be known as a warrior-saint among the Muslims, who revered him as “Ghazi Miyan”. Over time, the pilgrimage to his dargah increased so much that the site was not able to accommodate all the pilgrims. Consequently, his shrines were erected in other towns of the Awadh region, including Salargarh (named in his honour), Faizabad, Satrikh and Rudauli. The mazar of his father Salar Sahu (called “Birdha Baba” by Hindus) in Satrikh also became a pilgrimage site. 
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